When to Consider Psychotherapy














Therapy can help when symptoms are too many or too intense to be handled by our usual ways of coping. The therapy process provides an opportunity to safely attend to these symptoms and learn how to respond more effectively to them and to their underlying needs

When to Consider Psychotherapy


Good mental health can be generally defined as the ability to maintain good relationships with oneself — one's thoughts, feelings, behaviors, experiences, memories and intentions — with others and with our situations. It is the capacity to live safely and securely connected to oneself and others, which provides both the support and resources needed for life, healing and growth. When we are well connected with ourself and others, we are more receptive to life and satisfied in it. Our life is more integrated and fully available and we are more free to follow and fulfill what matters to us

No one’s life is fully integrated and intact. We all harbor conflicts that hurt and drive us in directions we later regret. We all have a measure of brokenness. When our internal conflicts and brokenness become too many or too much to handle, when they interfere with our ability to engage life as we want and need, psychotherapy has often proven to be a good resource for help and healing

Therapy requires investments of time, effort and money. Most people become willing to make these investments when their internal or situational problems become greater than their abilities to cope with them. Fortunately, our human nature has a kind of built in warning system that alerts us to the need for help with signals we commonly call symptoms. Symptoms assume such forms  as depression, anxiety, sleep disturbance, relational conflicts, complicated grief, reliving past trauma, or a confused sense of self. These and other symptoms indicate the need for therapy, especially when they are significantly interfering with our ability to engage life as we need or to be satisfied in life as we want

Therapy can help when symptoms are too many or too intense to be handled by our usual ways of coping. The therapy process provides an opportunity to safely attend to these symptoms and learn how to respond more effectively to them and to their underlying needs